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Location: Fordham Law School Building, Skadden Conference Center, 150 W 62nd Street, New York, NY 10023
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Tuesday, May 3 • 1:30pm - 1:50pm
Empirical Study on the Multiscreen Communication Effects of Television Programs

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The advancement of Internet technologies had demolished the screen berries between TVs, PCs and smartphones and revolutionized the matrix of communication. In this trend of TVs merging with new media, the effective interaction between different channels is vital to ensure a successful blend of these two. This paper measured, computed and did comparative analysis on enormous data about phenomenal TV programs in China, and eventually came to the conclusion that, for the same TV program, the interactive streaming on PCs and portable devices (e.g. Internet media, Internet video, social media, etc.) showed a significant positive correlation with the audience rating on traditional TV media. This finding corroborates that multiscreen broadcasting largely stimulates the development of traditional TV media.

Authors
avatar for Yanfang Bu

Yanfang Bu

Communication University of China
Dr. Yanfang Bu is a professor in the Communication University of China. From February 2013 to February 2014, she was a visiting scholar in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. From August 2007 to August 2008, she was a visiting scholar in Seoul National University, Korea. Dr. Bu’s academic area is media economics and management, especially she focuses on the TV media and new media.
FC

Fang Chen

Communication University of China

Moderators
avatar for H. Iris Chyi

H. Iris Chyi

The University of Texas at Austin
Iris Chyi (Ph.D.) is an associate professor in the School of Journalism at the University of Texas at Austin. Her research focuses on the economics of online journalism, addressing key issues and troubles facing the newspaper industry. Her “Ramen Noodles Theory” suggests that online news, like Ramen Noodles, is an inferior good. She assesses the viability of digital paywalls and identifies counterintuitive patterns of demand for... Read More →


Tuesday May 3, 2016 1:30pm - 1:50pm
Room 408 Law School
  • Manuscript # 1073
  • Session # A25

Attendees (3)